State Recognized Tribes

Native Americans in Vermont

Vermont's Native history started 12,900 years ago when people called the Paleo-Indians first moved into the land we now call Vermont. Since these earliest occupations nearly 13,000 years ago, Native communities have continually lived in Vermont. Native knowledge, experience, and traditions have deeply influenced many aspects of Vermont's rich history.

Native American Indian Tribes Recognized by the State of Vermont

 

Abenaki Nation at Missisquoi and the Koasek Band of the Koas Abenaki Nation

On May 7, 2012 the Abenaki Nation at Missisquoi and the Koasek Band of the Koas Abenaki Nation received recognition by the State of Vermont.

(Above: Left to right - Elnu Chief Roger Longtoe; Nulhegan Chief Don Stevens; Koasek Chief Nancy Doucet; Governor Peter Shumlin; Missisquoi Acting Chief John Churchill)

 

Elnu Abenaki Tribe and the Nulhegan Abenaki Tribe

On April 22, 2011 the Elnu Abenaki Tribe and the Nulhegan Abenaki Tribe received recognition by the State of Vermont

(Left to right - Elnu Chief Roger Longtoe; Governor Peter Shumlin; Nulhegan Chief Don Stevens; Fred Wiseman)

 

Tribe Status

  • The Elnu Abenaki Tribe was aforded State Recognition on April 22, 2011
  • The Nulhegan Abenaki Tribe was aforded State Recognition on April 22, 2011
  • The Koasek Traditional Band of the Koas Abenaki Nation was aforded State Recognition on May 7, 2012
  • Abenaki Nation at Missisquoi was aforded State Recognition on May 7, 2012

Contact Us

Jess Robinson - State Archaeologist
Division for Historic Preservation

1 National Life Drive, Davis Building, 6th Floor
Montpelier, VT 05620-0501
802-272-2509

Jenni Lavoie - Administrative Assistant
Division for Historic Preservation

1 National Life Drive, Davis Building, 6th Floor
Montpelier, VT 05620-0501
802-828-3540